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, the nsa came underfire in the senate judiciary committee, republicans and democrats raising serious questions about the big phone spying program of nsa. we'll bring you up to date on that and a whole lot more right here on current tv. (vo) current tv gets the conversation started weekdays at 9 eastern. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. the troops love me. tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. you're welcome current tv audience for the visual candy. (vo) sharp tongue. >>excuse me? (vo) quick wit. >> and yes, president obama does smell like cookies and freedom. (vo) and above all, opinion and attitude. >> really?! this is the kind of they just pulled freshly from their [bleep]. >> you know what those people are like. >> what could possibly go wrong in eight years of george bush? >> my producer just coughed up a hairball. >>sorry. >>just be grateful current tv doesn't come in "smell-o-vision" >> oh come on! the sweatshirt is nice and all, but i could use a golden lasso. (vo)only on current tv. cenk off air>>> alright in 15 minutes we're going to
have posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very thatly about the nsa, and is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. doing himsa has been as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts onwhat they call metadata your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was thently disclosed, and problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection to a terrorist or not. they decided that they have the authority to gather up everyone's
there, chris lavoie, jim ward. before we -- lots of big news obviously, nsa, all of that stuff. however, more importantly, nancy in ohio says omg, thanks to listening to a steph cast, only $4.95 a month, and then taking a shower that sound of trying to get the last drops of shampoo out of my bottle will never sound the same. it sounds exactly like turtle sex. eh, eh. >> stephanie: you don't want to wait. just that last little -- i apologize for that. [ applause ] >> wow! >> stephanie: all right. >> she thought of this when she was in the shower. >> it sounded like someone else's faucet? >> stephanie: right. the guy didn't repair his faucet correctly. that's how it sounds when he needs water. all right. in the meantime, because we should just start monday, we should start the week with some weirdness. >> yeah? >> stephanie: rocky mountain mike for some reason has decided to combine turtle sex, dana loesch, cody the screaming dog and barry white. why not? >> because he can. ♪ >> stephanie: that's weird. [dana loesch screaming] >> wow. >> like having sex with mitch mcconnell. >> stephani
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
for joining us bright and early. another nsa spying bombshell. not only did they break thousands of laws while watching americans, but they claim they did it all by mistake. this is the scandal that keeps getting worse. we'll explain it. >> muslim groups planning a million muslim march set to take place on, get, this 9/11. why? because they say they are the real victims of that attack. >> clayton: take a look at this. a woman not doing any favor to her genders. repeated attempted to exit the garage. ms. al con camerota. it goes on for liar like a minute. she gets out. yeah. that's not going to work. does this prove that women can't drive? we're going to debate it next. "fox & friends" begins right now. hi. my name is alexandra, you are watching my favorite show. "fox & friends." >> alisyn: that's my daughter. >> is it really her favorite show? >> alisyn: it is her favorite show but i would never let her watch it. >> clayton: sounds like a character from the disney show. >> alisyn: i didn't know she recorded that my 8-year-old daughter is with us today she asleep at the moment. >> clayton: it's
to that new "the washington post" report concerning the nsa. the report says the nsa broke privacy rules or overstep its legal authority thousands of time each year since 2008. >>> it's not a problem. it worked. if you have 99.9% compliance and so few reporting errors this came from an internal report which then becomes part of an overall ig report. i'm on the intelligence committee. i'm satisfied we're told. >> the problem and there is a real problem with the system. it's a black box, the fisa court is a secret tribunal issuing secret opinions making secret law and a lot of it completely unavailable to members even of the foreign intelligence committee. >> those documents published by the "the washington post" were leaked by edward snowden. >>> this weekend has been a wash out in parts of the south. heavy rains flooded several streets in north carolina and more rain is expected through the weekend. will it end? when is the question. we have more on that. >> we're still keeping an eye on the rain up and down the east coast. it's streaming in off the gulf of mexico and the southeast will
begins a week-long family vacation. among the likely topics today, obamacare, the nsa, the terror threat overseas and our bumpy relationship with russia. joining me now for her take on what to expect today is monica crowley, fox news contributor. monica, always good to have you with us here on "happening now." the president, he is facing some questions today from the quote, unquote, news media as opposed to what he did the other night on tuesday with jay leno which is a softer approach. what do you think he is going to face today? >> actually jay leno asked him tougher questions. kelly: good for jay leno. >> sometimes than we see from the white house press corps, right? the president does in press conferences. he runs out the clock and take a question and tends to filibuster. i have a feeling this press conference lasts about an hour which is usually the time frame, he will run out the clock and run out the door to his vacation. i expect he will get a couple questions on nsa. for example he told jay leno earlier this week that the u.s. does not have a domestic spying program yet "the new
substantials and the n.s.a. and the i.r.s. and suddenly we get this alert that something could be happening in the arab world somewhere toward western interests, and it is pro-administration. we've heard this a million times. judge, i'm with you on this. it does look like -- >>gretchen: what if something huge does happen? i think we should keep our eye on the prize. >>steve: just that they would reveal such detail. they burned a source and a method, and that's the problem. they could still say be careful if you're in these areas. but to be so specific to make it look like the administration is working overtime, look at these fantastic avenues of intel, that is troubling. >> another scandal on a lesser scale the republican national committee is threatening to blackball nbc and cnn from the republican presidential debates if the networks don't scratch their pro-hillary clinton films. i mean, what kind of sense does this make for nbc and cbs -- >>gretchen: cnn. >> thank you. to be publishing films about hillary clinton. could you imagine if fox published one about mitt romney or george w. bush
on a wide range of issues, including u.s.-russia relations and likely the nsa surveillance programs. indications are that he will make some sort of statement of the top of the news conference and it is likely to be about the nsa. the new york times" says at resident plans to launch new efforts. the president is endorsing a new policy panel to review surveillance powers. independent attorney to argue against the government before the surveillance courts. so some of the things that we're likely to hear but as the resident begins the news conference this afternoon. it will -- as the president begins the news conference this afternoon. after the news conference is done, we plan to open up our phones than hear from you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] afternoon, everybody, please have a seat. over the past few weeks, i have been talking about what i believe should be our priorities for the country. i am focused on the number one responsibility as commander-in- chief, keeping the american people safe. in rece
the nsa, snowden, what's the future of privacy and security issues? guest: this congress is going to take them up. we saw representtive rutchersburger was telling us yesterday before they headed home and they had a meeting at the white house to talk about the nsa that there appears to be an appetite for some type of additional layers of oversight. but we're going to see intel committee members and leadership, both parties on both sides of the building defending that nsa program. they're the people who get to read and see the things that are class fid that the rest of us don't and keep insisting the program is important and needs to be there. it will be a little bit of a fight, a disagreement moving forward. host: rod is next. caller: i had a question about congressman watt and the likelihood of him getting full enate confirmation to head the fhfa and what's so important about mel watt getting full senate confirmation? guest: i haven't been following that appointment very closely. we just saw some real stickler appointments going through the senate. he members of the nlrb, some in the e.p.
harman, and the nsa former nsansel. -- general counsel. this is one hour, 10 minutes. >> the title of this panel, as you see, is counterterrorism, national security, and the rule of law. the tension between what the law demands and what the national defense requires is, in essence, what this panel is about. we are pleased to have one of america's premier investigative journalists. mike joined nbc news in 2010 as the national investigative correspondent. we all know he covered, among other things, the boston marathon bombing and the newtown shooting massacre. he appears regularly on nbc news. he is also the author of new york times best-selling books "hubris" and also "uncovering clinton." go ahead. >> thank you. and i want to thank you again for assembling great panels every year. you get newsmakers and future newsmakers to serve on these panels. last year, i served on a panel with paula broadwell. while i do not expect any of our distinguished panelists to make news like that this year, i think they will all be in the spotlight in some form. to my left, the general counsel of the
asked about the nsa data collection program. he also got a question about same-sex marriage. here is a look. about allso worried the gay rights stuff, like i am thinking like this could be another races and a, where it is like the same thing, but gays and non-gays am a big fight and who really cares? -- does itlly matter really matter? >> that is a great point. do not believe the government should be involved in deciding who can get married. i think that is not an appropriate role for the federal government. foran appropriate role government. marriage is a private institution. i am an orthodox christian. my wife and i do not need government telling us that we can get married. nobody else needs the government telling them that they can get married. this is up to them. i agree with you. of awas a brief part recent town hall meeting. we will show you the entire event tonight starting at 5:45 earlier today, we should do an event with texas senator ted cruz and a couple of items on the agenda for republicans in the near future. he also made news of his own today related to his birth re
an amendment that would bar the nsa from using funds to collect phone and data records from citizens not subject to an investigation. the amendment which was opposed by house leader john boehner in the white house was defeated by a vote of 205-217. this town hall held in marshall michigan is just over an hour. [applause] >> hello everyone. he is my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me so if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office my main district office. you can find that on my web site. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there is something you would like to schedule or an appointment you would like to schedule contact her grand rapids office so we can make sure we have someone down here to meet with u.s. well in calhoun county. by district director is not here today but he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office to reach him please feel free to do so. he is always around except for today but for a good cause he is not here today. but, he is a great
the nsa a is not operating these microphones clearly. [laughter] or maybe barack obama is. that's a good point. it's wonderful to be here tonight. wonderful to be here at the steam boat institute. i think it's long past time that the aspen institute got a doze of truth and reality and facts. [applause] and we're thrilled to be part of that effort here tonight. we thought we would do a cup of things. we want to talk about current events, but the most important current event in our lives in our family has been the fact that my dad was bless -- we were all blessed. my dad was a recipient a of new heart a little over a year ago. [applause] and his story, you know, he talked about his first campaign for office when he was elected, and 1967, when i was running the first time was also the first time he had a heart attack, and i've been going back for reasons you can imagine looking at some old news clippings about political campaigns in wyoming, and came across one where my dad was asked about his heart attack in 1978. after he had the attack and decided he was going stay in the race he was int
i concerns about this technology. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology bit.could be abused a i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are
broad new powers in 2008. "the washington post" made the analysis after getting documents from former n.s.a. analyst edward snoweden, now congress is getting involved. short time ago we talked with a reporter fouling this story. -- following this story. >> we are joined by jenifer martinez of the hill. why is judiciary committee chairman patrick leahy calling for another round of hearings on the n.s.a.? >> he's doing that in the wake of report that was published by "the washington post" late thursday, that n.s.a. had repeatedly broken privacy rules or overstepped its authority for years. soleil he came out today with -- so lie he came out with a statement today saying he remains concerned that congress is still not getting straightforward answers from the n.s.a., so he hopes to hold another hearing when congress returns to get these answers. >> how bad was this report that the "washington post" published on thursday? > it's definitely pret i damning. ust adds -- it would put the administration in even worse position than it was with the surveillance program. it also calls into question the
because of edward snowden an the nsa leaks. basically information on what we're doing to try to stop the next terrorist attack against americans. this is pretty explosive stuff. >> yeah. i mean this is increasing, the third rail of american politics, "the washington post" obtained new details about what it describes as a black budget for u.s. spy agencies. here are some of the revelations. the u.s. has spent more than half a trillion dollars on national intelligence programs following the 9/11 attacks. that number includes all 16 spy agencies. for the 2013 fiscal year alone, $52 billion was allocated for the program with the cry gettiag most at $14.7 billion as requested. according to the "washington post" despite the massive dollars spent on the programs, the agencies repain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security. threats. also raising eyebrows from the report the u.s. intelligence lumps israel in with hostile foes like iran, cuba, china and russia as a key target for u.s. counter intelligence efforts. it's amazing how much money sinc
the bill barring the nsa from using funds to collect the data records from citizens on the subject and investigation. >> she's my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me. if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office. you can find that on my website, amash.house.gov. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there's something you would like to schedule, an appointment you'd like to schedule if you contact the grand rapids office we can make sure we have someone here to meet with you as well in calhoun county. my district director is jordan bush. he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office, feel free to do so. he's always around except for today but for good cause he's not here today. but he is a great resources with any number of issues. i do telephone town halls from time to time. so if you would like to get out those phone calls please let the staff know. you can talk to ben before you leave. as we do those from time to time that gives you another way to stay
the nsa issue we have been facing in washington? guest: it is an interesting issue that concerns me. but it is interesting when i am home, i don't hear it much. small group ofa people. but when i am just at the coffee shop, that doesn't come up. up a lot.mes host: jake in fairhaven, massachusetts. independent line. lee terry. republican of nebraska. all her co-how is it going? -- caller: i was a going? i think the major deal as people think they should make a lot more money than they should. i think they should give a good cap scott two people working part-time -- tax cut for people working part-time jobs but not making a lot of money. get aple would want to part-time job or maybe not such a great job. i think that would put more money in their pocket. i notice when people get their tax returns and whatnot, they put all that money back into whatever -- buying a new tv or whatever. i think that would help the economy out. i talk to people and they think they should be making $20, $30 an hour because they think they deserve it. but really what i think it is, if they gave a good tax br
obama spoke about a range of issues including surveillance programs at nsa and u.s./russian relations. this is about 55 minutes. >> good afternoon. these have a seat. over the past few weeks thomas i've been talking about what i believe should be our number one priority in the country. building a better bargain for the middle class and for americans who want to work your way into the middle class. at the same time i am focused on my number one priority -- keeping the american people safe. been reminded once again about the threats to our nation. as i said at the national defense university, and meeting those threats we have to strike the right balance between protecting our security and our freedoms. as part of this rebalancing, i called for review of our surveillance programs. unfortunately, rather than orderly and lawful process, the , repeated leaks of classified information has initiated the debate in a very passionate but not always informed way. i held a healthy skepticism of these programs as a senator and as president i have taken steps to make sure that they have strong overs
to show you this banner headline in the "washington journal" this morning. an audit said that the n.s.a. repeatedly broke privacy rules who has been on this story for quite some time. writes this morning that the n.s.a. overstep its legal authorities thousands of times this year -- host: back to the egypt question about aid. bob is hanging on in manassas, virginia, democrat. thank you for waiting, bob. caller: yeah, we should not pull the funding. if we do, we will support the radicals. the only stabilizing force in egypt is the military. they're western professional folks. they do not -- they're not like a third world country like the folks in south america. these guys are trying to stabilize the situation. they responded because the brotherhood was taunting them. they did overrespond, but the brotherhood after they got the -- that's going on, they went and destroyed 50 churches and christian organizations in egypt has retaliation. they're hiding in the buildings. judah is exactly correct. there should not be allowed to be empowered to the same type of folks who were in iran when they
supporting the ousted president there. repeated violations of privacy rules by the nsa thomas calling for operations of the program. at a state justice in pennsylvania has blocked a voter id law there. this is in time for the november 5 special election. journal," ahington three-hour program for you. our first 45 minutes is looking at politics, looking to you specifically on this topic am a who best represents your political party? the rnc concluding its summer meeting, talking about its future as far as 2016 is concerned. visits to iowa by joe biden. for the first 45 minutes we want to hear from the people that best represents your political party. divided the lines by political party. if you want to give us a tweet on this topic you can send that our way@c-spanwj. send us an e-mail at journal@c- span.org. couple ofurred by a different things. "the wall street journal" has a new writeup about the rnc meeting. the head of the rnc talked a little bit about the 2016 strategy. in this write up this morning, he said -- that ist abt the strategy on the republican side. on the democratic s
-- on foreign-policy, -- this headline from "the washington post" -- -- that is the nsa leaks, the former nsa staffer, edward snowden, the reporter who first worked on that. there will be more on that story in today's new york times. on our democratic line from pennsylvania. pat, we are talking the president's priorities. we have gone over a few foreign- policy issues. what do you think the top priority should be, foreign or domestic policy? the top priority should be foreign-policy. in particular, a complete disconnection from the state of israel, which we are now finding is a nation leading israeli intelligence officers. these are the american equivalent of the fbi director, cia director, who are now creating a state of israel like not to germany. when secretary kerry detained the leading state department ,fficial of the united states the statement was, at least i can go where i want now. host: where are you getting your information? caller: i know this for a fact. there are photographs of netanyahu on the walls. host: how do you know this as a fact? explain where you get your facts from. c
which is the nsa who every three months is going to this fisa court which is a secret court which no one can appeal to. and they're getting warrants to get cell phone records basically every single american, okay? you have an fbi who believes that and has went to court to say that they do not, they don't need, basically they don't need a warrant to put a gps tracking device on your car. you've got an irs whose official position is that they don't need a warrant to check your e-mail. this, of course, is that same irs that has no compunction about using -- abusing their authority. they have targeted tea party groups and so far nobody has really paid a price for that. and so read the situation that i find, i think i'm and i might be the only person who feels it is about nothing is being done to rein in these government agencies. and so from my perspective it's like, well, the only privacy really have is what the government says that you have to. and i was really pumped when you voted against -- that was awesome, i was really happy about that. i was really disappointed that you voted against
the ramification of the nsa/prism issue as that continues to be a topic of concern in europe. russia will clearly be a topic ask be, of course, syria, egypt, the middle east and the unrest there. so i believe you'll see a very fulsome bilateral conversation within the nordic state, and i think it's an excellent preparation to get the president ready as he travels to st. petersburg to meet with his g8 -- g20, excuse me, colleagues. and, matt, i'll let you take the baton. >> let me introduce matt really quickly. matt goodman holds our william simon chair in political economy. the sigh hon chair examines current issues this international economic policy with a lahr focus on the asia pacific. but i should also say that matt previously served as the white house coordinator for the east asia summit, for the asia-pacific summit many, but he also served as director on the nsc staff and was responsible for the g20, g8 and other international forums. and with that, i'd like to introduce my colleague, matt goodman. >> thank you, ann i drew. hank, heather. so the president will be participating in the eighth
nation's surveillance programs have helped thwart terrorist attacks because of the n.s.a. and f.b.i. personnel who work on these activities every day and working hard to comply with the law to protect our constitutional liberties and keep america safe. and contrast to the efforts of those hardworking, law-abidinging personnel, americans have serious reservations about attorney general holder and clapper who have -- who are ultimately responsible for the management of these programs. we remain gravely concerned about their lack to follow the law, be forthright with the american people and congress, and commitment to protect our actually guaranteed liberties. continued congressional oversight coupled with the terminations of clapper and holder will help restore these fight terrorism without compromising our liberties or creating gaps in our intelligence structure. in addition the removal may start the healing process to restore america's trust in our federal government. thank you, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from
the republican party. you see it manifest in various debates. you see it in the debate about n.s.a. insure veeps -- surveillance program. you see it with aid to egypt. there's no question what rand paul is leading the movement for a very different kind of republican foreign policy. i don't know who's going to prevail in that debate. we'll know when the republicans choose a nominee in 2016. host: go to john in minnesota on our republican line. caller: i was wondering why israel doesn't get involved? we pour all the money into israel. seem like this is more concerning them than us. they just sit back and don't do anything. just take our money. it's because of dick cheney and the neocons that we can't get coalition that the rest of the world don't trust us because of iraq. host: what is israel doing now? guest: israel is doing what they ought to be doing. most of the world would want them to do is stand on the sidelines and their producting themselves and preparing themselves in case syria decides it use chemical weapons against them. i don't know anybody including critics of the president, wa
at the fisa debate. a lot of people looked at other stories we wrote about fisa, and about nsa spying and that sort of thing. it put a human face, i think, on the otherwise inpenetrable government bureaucracy system going on. nobody ever really stands exactly -- don't understand what is going on when nsa decides to tap someone's phone. and it was a nice way to sort of show that to people. >> i agree with john when he mentioned that people seem to be more plugged in to politics now than they have ever been. there are part of the explosion of media outlet on capitol hill covering politics since 2006, 2007.ort what you see is that people are only going places that reenforce their already-held opinions. so it's important -- we all -- all of our organizations do really well, is to provide an independent viewpoint or independent look at what is going on in in washington that is simplified enough for the common person, the nonpolitical person to understand but nuanced enough that, you know, you're not boiling it down to something where they're not getting anything out of it. like, i was talk
of the recent nsa disclosures that we're learning about is, you know, if you don't have members of congress and the u.s., the american people knowing about what the government is doing and the kind of extraordinary power they want to make the country safe, then, you know, you do risk the sense this will just be the kind of permanent war that will never end, and you will never be able to grapple, and that creates a national security bureaucracy. but that said, the idea that you just want to -- you know, if you were to say that we should repeal that aumf, then you would effectively be saying you don't think there currently is a war, and as tom said, the enemy gets a vote, and they're still at war with us. that's kind of where i'm at. >> let me just throw into the discussion, i'm pretty sure president obama suggested before the closing of the diplomatic outposts that the authorization for the use of military force, that congress should consider repealing it. but again, that -- >> or modifying it. >> or modifying it. very different, i guess. the idea of repealing it would be based on the narrat
asylum former nsa contractor edward snowden. speaker john boehner also talked about the budget process in this 10 minute briefing. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> good morning, everyone. yesterday i met with the house chairman leading the investigation on benghazi. the chairman has been doing good work, much of it behind the again, but i stress once that we need to get to the bottom of what happened that terrible night, why it happened, and how we can prevent similar tragedies in the future. are also continuing to investigate the irs for its abusive power. there is nothing phony about these scandals, mr. president. when four americans are dead, not when the agency when enforcing your health care law has been harassing because of their political beliefs. the american people deserve answers and we will continue to fight for the truth, no matter how badly the administration wants to sweep these issues under the carpet. learned thatk, we our economy continues to muddle along at an unacceptable pace. this is
on the climate. >> host: what about the nsa issue that nfacing? >> guest: it's an interesting issue that concerns me but interesting that when i'm home i don't hear it much. i hear it from a small group of people but when i'm at the coffee shop that one doesn't come up. the irs one comes up a lot of though. >> host: jake in massachusetts on the independent line the republican of nebraska is the guest. >> caller: people think they need to make a lot more money than they should. in that case they should get a good tax credit to the people working good full-time jobs but not making a bunch of money. so, people would want to get a part-time job but not such a great job. it would put more money in their pockets at. and i notice when people get their tax returns and what not, they put all that money back and buy a new tv or read a4a pity the the what help the economy. it's just i talk to people and they think they should be making 20 or $30 an hour because they think they deserve that. but really what i think is if they give a good tax break to the part-time and the people who may be are making the $40
the relationship especially in light of what's happened with edward snowden and the nsa, that relationship with, between the foreign-facing come poems, the national security facing come poems of the american be government and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically? >> well, there are two trends, scott, that are important. upside pinnings of your -- underpinnings of your question. first of all, oh the last decade -- over the last decade increasing lu the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad. and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here on privately-owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid for purposes of today, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but, of course, also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security which will always be with in the lead for the federal government, never t
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)